September 29, 2011

So I started a blouse pt. 4

I started this blouse project for very selfish reasons. I am in need of some nice, fitted blouses and I can't seem to find any in the stores. While I am thin, I still need to buy large size blouses. My extra long arms create the biggest fit problems. I rarely find long sleeved blouses with long enough sleeves. If I do manage to find long enough sleeves, it's short lived until I wash the blouse and the sleeves shrink. Other fit issues concern the perpetual gaping at center front. So if I fit one of those areas, others areas don't fit. Drooping shoulders, general bagginess, wide back, etc.

I also wanted to regain lost skills. I can turn out a little girl's dress in a few hours with my eyes closed. An adult size blouse/shirt is something else entirely. And while I have done it in the past, it has been a long time.

I am not reinventing the wheel. But I am taking the time to compare traditional home sewist methods with what I know of industrial methods. LisaB comments:
I'm sorry your first attempt at attaching the collar and stand didn't work out well. As a home sewer, I can say that there are numerous methods promoted within the community, so I'm not sure that any one of them is "usual". In fact, lately I haven't come across any that wrap the button band around the collar stand. Rather, the two collar stands are attached "around" the button band.
The method I described previously is found in the Reader's Digest Sewing Book, with the exception of wrapping the button band around the collar. That was my mistake and assumption. It clearly didn't work. The button band and collar stand don't match up precisely.

I've also highlighted a number of issues with my blouse. The collar is proportionally too big. The shaping of the collar stand. The length of the collar is too short. All things I will attempt to correct. I'm also mulling over changing the shape of the armhole. During this process, I'm studying what's been done before.

The collar stand of this blue blouse was attached to the neckline last. The inside collar stand was turned and topstitched down. The opposite of what I was thinking (stand attached to the collar last). Hmmm. I think either way would work.

I've also been looking at the shapes and proportions. This collar does not quite line up with center front. The collar stand also narrows a bit towards center front, which is precisely sewn onto the button band.


I like the proportion of the collar on this white blouse.


This collar lines up perfectly with center front, but has a very different shape on the collar stand.

One thing I noticed about both blouses is that a much lighter weight interfacing was used in the collars. No interfacing was used in the button bands.

I've got some work ahead of me still.















1 comment:

  1. I should have mentioned this before, but Sigrid has compiled links to tutorials from around the internet. These are all aimed at the home sewing community, though some do include industrial techniques or close to it.

    The link below contains collar-related tutorials.
    http://sewingtutorials.blogspot.com/2008/05/topstees.html

    Links to Pam Erny's (from Off the Cuff blog; she's a shirtmaker) tutorials are part way down. The method she demonstrates for attaching stand to shirt most closely matches the shirts that I've de-constructed. However, I have never been successful with this method myself.

    I am just about ready to attach collar to stand and then stand to blouse on my own project. I am going to try attaching the stand just like a cuff as demonstrated by Kathleen at Fashion-Incubator. I've had good success with cuffs, so why not with a stand, too?
    http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/reverse_engineering_standard_work_pt7/

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